The curse of Meroz; or, The danger of neutrality, in the cause of God, and our country.
Read Online
Share

The curse of Meroz; or, The danger of neutrality, in the cause of God, and our country. A sermon, preached the 2d of October, 1757. by Samuel Finley

  • 805 Want to read
  • ·
  • 52 Currently reading

Published by Printed and sold by James Chattin, at the newest-printing-office, on the south side of the Jersey-Market. in Philadelphia .
Written in English

Subjects:

  • United States -- History -- French and Indian War, 1755-1763 -- Addresses, sermons, etc.

Book details:

Edition Notes

StatementBy Samuel Finley, A.M. Minister of the Gospel, in Nottingham, Pennsylvania. ; Published at the desire of many. ; [Four lines of Scripture texts]
SeriesEarly American imprints -- no. 7893.
The Physical Object
FormatMicroform
Paginationiv, 5-32 p.
Number of Pages32
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL14587000M

Download The curse of Meroz; or, The danger of neutrality, in the cause of God, and our country.

PDF EPUB FB2 MOBI RTF

The curse of Meroz ; or, The danger of neutrality, in the cause of God, and our country.: a sermon, preached the 2d of October, The Curse of Meroz, Or, the Danger of Neutrality, in the Cause of God, and Our Country: A Sermon Preached the 2D of October, : Samuel Finley: Libri in altre lingueFormat: Copertina flessibile. Add tags for "The curse of Meroz ; or, The danger of neutrality, in the cause of God, and our country. A sermon, preached the 2d of October, ". A sermon, preached the 2d of October, ". Be the first. Curse ye Meroz — A place then, no doubt, eminent and considerable, though now there be no remembrance of it left, which possibly might be the effect of this bitter curse; as God cursed Amalek in this manner, that he might utterly blot out their remembrance. And this place, above all others, may be thus severely cursed, because it was near the.

Gill's Notes on the Bible. Curse ye Meroz, said the angel of the Lord,.Not Barak, as the Targum and Jarchi, but Deborah herself said this under a spirit of prophecy, not from her own spirit in a revengeful way, but from the Spirit of God; or this was suggested to her by an angel, not a created, but the uncreated one, the Angel of the covenant, by whom she was inspired, and an impulse made.   In the Book of The Judges – “The Curse of Meroz” came about because the common people refused to come to the help of their own kinsfolk who were being oppressed. Ancient Meroz was a village 12 miles from Samaria in the land of Canaan where the Israelites were defending their homes, property and families from the onslaught of their enemies. Meroz - A place then, no doubt, eminent and considerable, tho' now there be no remembrance of it left, which possibly might be the effect of this bitter curse; as God curseth Amalek in this manner, that he would utterly blot out their remembrance. The Curse of Meroz, Or, the Danger of Neutrality, in the Cause of God, and Our Country: A Sermon Preached the 2D of October, avg rating — 0 ratings — published /5(1).

In one sermon, Finley declared himself “fired with a patriot Zeal” as he warned against “The Danger of Neutrality, in the Cause of God, and our Country.” [17] Finley’s “New Light” thinking and experience as an educator in Nottingham primed him for a leadership role in the College of New Jersey, which was founded in in. '' Strong, Sermon, 20; Samuel Finley, The Curse of Meroz; the Danger of Neutrality, in the Cause of God, and our Country (Philadelphia: James Cattin, ), 10 (Evans No. Casto. The cause between God and the mighty (the principalities and powers of the kingdom of darkness) will not admit of neutrality. God looks upon those as against him that are not with him. This curse is pronounced by the angel of the Lord, our Lord Jesus, the captain of the Lord’s host (and those whom he curses are cursed indeed), and further.   Speaking in his own context of poverty in Latin America, Gustavo Gutiérrez describes the danger of neutrality: It is not possible to remain neutral in the face of poverty and the resulting just claims of the poor; a posture of neutrality would, moreover, mean siding with the injustice and oppression in our midst. (A Theology of Liberation, p. ).